FBI förstod produktivitet redan 1944

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Under andra världskriget jobbade FBI med produktivitetsfrågor. De gjorde sin alldeles egna produktivitetshandbok där man bland annat kunde läsa följande tips:

When possible, refer all matters to committees, for “further study and considera­tion.” Attempt to make the committees as large as possible — never less than five.

Hold conferences when there is more critical work to be done.

Be pleasant to inefficient workers; give them undeserved promotions.

Nu undrar du kanske – vad hade FBI med det här att göra? Och var de verkligen så här dåliga på produktivitet på 40-talet? Nej, såklart inte. Tipsen ingick i FBI:s “Simple Field Sabotage Manual”, en handbok till människor som befann sig i de ockuperade områdena och ville stötta de allierade. Det är metoder för att minska produktiviteten så mycket som möjligt.

Utan att återge alla kommer här några fler tips:

Make “speeches.” Talk as frequently as possible and at great length. Illustrate your “points” by long anecdotes and accounts of per­sonal experiences.

Insist on perfect work in relatively un­important products; send back for refinishing those which have the least flaw.

Visst känns en del igen? Beror det på att vi har FBI-sabotörer i våra verksamheter eller bara på att vi pratar för lite om hur vi kan öka produktiviteten? Oavsett vilket – FBI:s tips från 1944 går utmärkt att använda som en guide till hur man ökar produktiviteten. Man behöver bara vända på dem.

Här kommer några till (och allra sist en länk till hela boken):

General Interference with Organisations and Production

Organizations and Conferences

(1) Insist on doing everything through “channels.” Never permit short-cuts to be taken in order to expedite decisions.

(2) Make “speeches.” Talk as frequently as possible and at great length. Illustrate your “points” by long anecdotes and accounts of per­ sonal experiences. Never hesitate to make a few appropriate “patriotic” comments.

(3) When possible, refer all matters to committees, for “further study and considera­tion.” Attempt to make the committees as large as possible — never less than five.

(4) Bring up irrelevant issues as frequently as possible.

(5) Haggle over precise wordings of com­ munications, minutes, resolutions.

(6) Refer back to matters decided upon at the last meeting and attempt to re-open the question of the advisability of that decision.

(8) Be worried about the propriety of any decision — raise the question of whether such action as is contemplated lies within the juris­diction of the group or whether it might conflict with the policy of some higher echelon.

Managers and Supervisors

(1) Demand written orders.

(4) Don’t order new working materials until your current stocks have been virtually ex­ hausted, so that the slightest delay in filling your order will mean a shutdown.

(6) In making work assignments, always sign out the unimportant jobs first. See that the important jobs are assigned to inefficient workers of poor machines.

(7) Insist on perfect work in relatively un­important products; send back for refinishing those which have the least flaw. Approve other defective parts whose flaws are not visible to the naked eye.

(9) When training new workers, give in­complete or misleading instructions.

(10) To lower morale and with it, produc­tion, be pleasant to inefficient workers; give them undeserved promotions. Discriminate against efficient workers; complain unjustly about their work.

(11) Hold conferences when there is more critical work to be done.

(12) Multiply paper work in plausible ways. Start duplicate files.

(13) Multiply the procedures and clearances involved in issuing instructions, pay checks, and so on. See that three people have to approve everything where one would do.

Office Workers

(1) Make mistakes in quantities of material when you are copying orders. Confuse similar names. Use wrong addresses.

(4) In making carbon copies, make one too few, so that an extra copying job will have to be done.

(5) Tell important callers the boss is busy or talking on another telephone.

Employees

(1) Work slowly. Think out ways to in­ crease the number of movements necessary on your job: use a light hammer instead of a heavy one, try to make a small wrench do when a big one is necessary, use little force where consider­ able force is needed, and so on.

(4) Pretend that instructions are hard to understand, and ask to have them repeated more than once. Or pretend that you are particularly anxious to do your work, and pester the foreman with unnecessary questions.

(5) Do your work poorly and blame it on bad tools, machinery, or equipment. Complain that these things are preventing you from doing your job right.

(6) Never pass on your skill and experience to a new or less skillful worker.

(7) Snarl up administration in every pos­sible way. Fill out forms illegibly so that they will have to be done over; make mistakes or omit requested information in forms.

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